Without A Tax Base… There Will Be More Pot Holes.

escthemachine by Dr. Luis Almeida

escthemachine by Dr. Luis Almeida

Today, I had a flat tire. Shortly after discovering this fact, I went back to my house and immediately called my car’s dealership service department to help me fix the problem. Fortunately, they were already operating and accepting appointments for the day. All of the sudden, my wife stops by and asks, “Luis, don’t you have to work today?” I replied, “Yep! But my passenger’s tire is flat.” She immediately says, “Oh yes. This is a normal occurrence here in metro Jackson area. A lot of folks complain about tire problems because of the city holes.” As soon as she finished describing people’s concerns, I knew I had to write a blog post about it.

Technology is everywhere even though this same technology (or should I say lack thereof after companies decide to leave the region after a while and take their technology with them) is a variable for why I might have had a flat tire this morning. Metro Jackson Area is dire for tax monies and one of the main reasons for this fact is because its industrial park isn’t strong enough to generate enough funds in tax dollars to pay for the fixing of pot holes all across the city. One of the possible reasons why is because companies don’t like to pay their fair share of taxes to the city of Jackson, based on the argument that, We are making our city more technological, your people are getting jobs, why should we pay our fair share of taxes?” If you are not happy with our terms, these companies say, we are going to leave you and move somewhere in Kentucky or Texas and take our technology away.

The other reason is because advances in technology have decreased the need for companies to hire more employees which in effect has an impact in the overall accumulation of taxes paid to the state to fix our roads here in downtown Jackson. Am I saying that technology is part of the reason why the city if Jackson is full of pot holes? This is exactly what I am saying loud and clear. Look, this isn’t difficult to understand. The less jobs a metro area has to offer its citizens, the less tax monies the city gets overtime. The more replacing technology is infused in society, the less likely companies will hire human technology to be able to pay for the overall infrastructure of a city. In the current employment landscape of the United States, where companies get too many tax incentives because of their technology, problems like flat tires will continue to occur and many others.

Every time we infuse a new part to an existing system (like technology), repercussions will occur. In reality, technology isn’t the only variable that affects a living system. There are others… The problem is that a substantial number of people don’t think that technology really have these consequences on us.  Well, this is why I write and talk about TechnoModeration in society.        

Let me say this again. I like technology, I really do. Thinking that technology will make our lives better at all costs without thinking critically about its consequences it has on us all is dangerous, in my opinion. Because of modern industries adopted so much technology, cities now don’t have enough of a job base to support the overall infrastructure of our cities, Jackson (Detroit, Flint…) included. Is it a good thing? I don’t think so. It is 9:11am and I am here… in my car’s dealership still waiting for my tire to be fixed. I would love to have been at work producing but hey… I do recognize that my problems are minimal in comparison to the water that folks have to drink in Michigan.

By now you already know what I am about to say, “Use technology in moderation!” Let me ask you to also THINK with technology in moderation. Let’s think about the overall consequences of infusing too much technology in society. Which side effects will uncontrolled technology infusion have on us if we don’t control it a bit? More flat tires? You tell me.

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